Goal setting, publishing edition

Life is full of moving parts these days and little/no opportunities to write much fiction or get it publish-ready,  but this is being posted to set expectations for the year after this calendar one ends.

The plan for what’s left of the year is to submit one short story to conventional magazines, publish a novelette (40-60 pages) by December and the “reach goal” is to also publish a short story collection of 3 or 4 stories in their own shared world by December.  I have received good contact information for cover artists, proofreading/editing and formatting for ebook and print.

Contingent on getting scheduled, the publishing has a good chance of happening by December.

I’ll post further progress in October, unless I get the joy of being able to update sooner.

 

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Saturday is not so all right for writing.

I agree with this guy a little.  But mostly because research is all I’ve had any time or physical ability to do the last couple of weeks.  The research has been very useful for world-building, but I just haven’t had the energy to carry it into the world of the stories.  I built the firewood pile, but I’m too depleted to carry in some logs for the evening’s fire.

I never did get around to posting on Sundays, so I’ll put up a wealth post Monday.  I’d like to figure out some fiction writing system, but with the current upheavals, it looks like I’ll just have to wait until the big yellow ball in the sky is visible more than half an hour twice a week.  Because then the kids can run around under the sunshine and I can write in the shade.  We have a grove, although not as nice as the one we left behind in the deepwoods.   So at least for me, all accountability on writing fiction did was reveal that I need to restart in summer and hope the progress I make is enough to get me into a routine that can go toe to toe with the brutalizing winter and spring.

 

 

Saturday update #2

Haven’t written any fiction for the day, but if I manage it today or tomorrow I will post a Monday update.  This week was full of family emergencies that weren’t compatible with writing what I wanted to.  A poll about posting excerpts is below.  It’s worth considering.

Saturday writing update #1

Going to try something new to get more fiction done and “out in the world”.  And that is the one thing I haven’t tried: stating what I’ve done at regular intervals.

I usually work on two projects at a time out of a project pool of 10-12 ideas.  Currently I’m working on a “hard sf” novella and a post-apocalyptic or far-future short story.  The novella is complete as a story in its current form, but I have some backstory and details of the local setting I want to add in that will probably double the length.  The short story is perhaps 5-7 days in a row of writing to complete and yes I have performance/success anxiety over taking that last little step.  The other little catch with the short story is that it’s part of what I think will be 3-8 interlinked stories set in a common world.  Something like “The World Inside” by Robert Silverberg without all the pervotron parts.   So my brain doesn’t think of finishing one story as completing the mission, and maybe simply writing that out will help me over the hurdle and do the other stories too.

Anyway, long story short, this week I watched a documentary for backstory details on the novella and got some great ones to work in and I made no progress on the short story.  The plan for next week (I start weeks on Sundays) is to finish the short story and do an outline of the revisions to the novella.  I don’t think I need to see more than two or three more documentaries to get the kinds of details I want in the novella (food, social customs, male and female roles, clothing, how the houses and buildings look).

I have a lot on my plate this calendar year and the biggest obstacle to getting back to writing fiction regularly (3x/week or more) is that my days are filled up with kid-related logistics until next school year or another child is potty-trained, whichever comes first.  I used to find it strange how people would go off somewhere and binge-write for a few weeks a year and then nothing the rest of the year.  It’s usually a man thing, but it might end up being a mom thing in my case.  We’ll see how these updates help with avoiding that.

Fiction writing vs. blogging.

I have the usual obstacles of a mother of young children regarding writing at length, but I also have the difficulty of deciding whether to focus on fiction or continue poking around with nonfiction blog posts.

It’s a tough one, because I can’t put up the fiction as I go, nor can I really discuss it, since I may be working under pen names beyond the current one.  But I write fiction a lot faster than a blog post.  In the time I’m writing this, I could have just about done 500 words of fiction.  (About 10 minutes, btw.)

But on the other other hand, I’ve learned so many interesting things about modern American history and education, and some of them are helpful with the fiction.  It’s a dilemma.

 

Introducing civic natalism

“The early 20th century was the summit of civilization and human accomplishment.”

I think there is a good argument to be made for that statement. However, that is not quite what this post is about.

It’s about the worldview I’ve adopted as I’ve come to appreciate and learn more about that era of human history, a mere century or so ago. I discussed the idea that this blog was a way to work out an alternative to Rod Dreher’s Benedict Option, and now I think I’ve got a grasp on what that alternative is.

Civic natalism.

This post is just an introduction to the phrase as concept.  Civic natalism was what a surprising number of Americans had a century ago, but it was an effect.  We can look at what they had access to that we don’t have now and the goal is to find out how we can have those things in a modern society.  Theirs was atomized and global, too, they were the vanguard of globalism.  Natalism also is about more than just maxing your pregnancy numbers, it’s about making it possible for motherhood to be something fully human, so women don’t want to reject the natural outcome of marital intimacy.

They had the following:

  • Large casual labor pool, particularly of women.  This means that there were maids and nannies and cooks, but it means so much more than that.  It means that you could pay people to do a lot of normal things and lend occasional assistance.
  • No commuting. The commuting was, mostly, the long-distance travel type, which human societies have developed a lot of tools to deal with.  It typically wasn’t the hurry up and wait tension that daily commuting tends to put onto people.  It is very possible to reduce commuting, but a deeper analysis of commuting patterns with an eye towards family improvement and cohesion is needed.
  • Rational autonomy for children. This means society is structured so that children take as much responsibility for themselves as possible, appropriate to their age.
  • Advocacy for feminine leisure.  

Starts are always rocky, so I’ll just conclude with this.  I’ve finally secured enough readable copies of Gene Stratton-Porter’s non-fiction nature books and essays that I will resume a publishing order review of her work in the coming weeks. She was a fascinating example of civic natalism, even though she herself had only one child.  Her entire career as a housewife who wrote bestsellers and spent hours in nature studies that are a direct line to the Joel Salatin and Michael Pollan strain of environmentalism and farming is an Ur-example of what civic natalism can provide when “just” a side effect of wider social norms.  She was also an influential advocate for other women to have better homemaking conditions and society-wide support.

And yes, there will be some commentary about the politics of civic natalism.  They intersect with how the right wing in America used to have a pretty good deal for bright women to be housewives and how they threw it away.  But those same politics also intersect with radical feminist policy ideas about how to support motherhood.  To summarize those future posts, let’s just say Phyllis Schlafly was a radical feminist when it came to motherhood.

Blew my mind, too.

I am Shirley Jackson and Shirley Jackson is me

As T.W.O. would put it, that’s overegging the pudding a tadge.  I’ll never publish the most notorious and universal short story in American history.  More intimately, my husband is not a Kavorka Man.

But she and I both are housewives with strong intellectual drives living in whitopias where household help is only for weird inferior women who can’t manage entirely on their own or micromanage the bleep out of that poor cousin they did have come by a few days a week.  She couldn’t get nice college girls because mother’s helping was beneath them in 1950 and non-college girls were from families that hadn’t moved in 50-100 years and so they didn’t have anyone “strange” come help.  People tend to think college towns are all the same, but they operate along a continuum.  And Jackson was not in a college town where the degree was a MRS.

She also put her kids in preschool, which was called “community nursery school” and which 10-20% of women used back then.  Exact data is had to come by because of terminology and lack of collecting data issues.  And even back then it was the middle and up stay at home mothers who used it part-time and the smaller pool of working mothers using it full time.

I have her sense of anxiety and frustration, but not her pretty solid domestic skills. Our children find us odd but loving.  There is a sort of weirdly beautiful e-drama online somewhere where one of Stanley Jackson’s coed affairs is bragging about it on salon or something similar and Shirley’s kids post comments defending their mother and whaling on the smarmy coed selling the only interesting thing about herself. I was touched by the love her kids (one of which I think was a grandparent by now) had for her and their respect for her hard work keeping their home so it could be an entertainment vehicle for dad.

Stanley Jackson was a literary critic and professor who tomcatted around and expected his wife to produce both domestically and intellectually, but was jealous of her ability to get thousands of dollars for a handful of stories about women and children and often the domestic sphere.

I 100% do not think I can compete with the mad literary skills of Mrs. Jackson, but it’s reassuring in a strange way to know that this literary ninja had some of the same struggles I, a much more ordinary housewife, have sixty or so years later.

It also brings me back to wanting to smash conservatives in the face for chronically declaring that there was no widespread frustration among average women in the 1950s and during the WWII era and that anyone talking about it was just a loser who was unhaaaaappppy or a communist.  Shirley Jackson wrote for Good Housekeeping, for pity’s sake.  She was not writing some edgy scandal stuff like Peyton Place.  And yet there remain in both sets of writing much the same sort of struggles of women trying to adapt to the rapid shifts in technology, social roles and relationships with men.

One of the anecdotes in her domestic memoirs is about a pregnant woman she meets at the hospital when she has her third baby who is running late on delivering and is relieved and happy to be free of household tasks for what in the anecdote is about two weeks and heading into a third.  General audiences of women wouldn’t have wanted to read about stuff like that if it didn’t seem real.  They were very quick to write letters where they believed something to be unrealistic in its slicing of life.

Anyway I’ve only just begun reading her domestic memoirs and that sensation of being drawn close in time to a writer across so many seismic changes in daily life is dizzying.