45% of SAHMs are in households earning 75k or more annually (2018 update).

And of that number, 2/3  are still in households earning 100k/yr or more.  Those numbers have been pretty stable over the last decade.  The percentage has gone up because there’s been a further decline in married parents while the total number of SAHMs was essentially unchanged from the earlier data.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2018 Annual Social and Economic Supplement

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Less than 25% of America’s businesses have paid employees.

“The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these nonemployer establishments average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally.”

“Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating a very small unincorporated business, which may or may not be the owner’s principal source of income.”

Here’s a handy chart of how the nonemployers are distributed by industry.

two-thirds-nations-businesses-do-not-have-paid-employees-figure-1

“The three states with the largest percentage of nonemployer establishments are Texas (79.5 percent), Georgia (79.4 percent) and Florida (79.0 percent). North Dakota is the only state where more than 30 percent of the establishments have paid employees.”

Interesting what the surrounding context is for self-employment these days.

Excerpts and chart from the census, here.

Fast facts about married parent income compared to all households (2017 numbers).

Things have changed a bit for 2017, mostly because a bunch of kids aged out and there’s way fewer married households with under-18 kids around.

Less than 9% of all households making under 50k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 20% of all households making 50-99k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 30% of all households making 100-149k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 35% of all households making 150k/yr or more are married with under-18 kids.

Lost percentage at the very bottom and the tippy top.

Source: 2017 ACS data on household income in the past 12 months.

What average salary should men and women be making to get married?

Apparently the answer is “20k more than the woman you plan to wife up”.

The gap between married women and married men’s average earnings is about 20k regardless of actual earnings until men are in their 30s, when married men’s average goes up into 40k more than the married women average through their 30s.

So guys who are married in their early 20s average 30k, but girls married in their early 20s average 10k.  Mid20s, 50k/30k, respectively.  Mid30s, 70k/50k.

Another way to look at it is that single men never boost their earnings out of the range they share with married women (for both single men and married women, average income peaks around 50k/yr through 30s and 40s).  Men who want to marry all start out higher earning, even among men who marry by 20.

So the single guys who remain at each stage of average income are the ones who just aren’t making the financial leaps upward.  Single women have it even worse, they don’t hit that 50k peak until their 50s, and are down in the 40k range through most of their working years, below married women and single men.

One interesting set of interpretations is that married women on average expect married men to be the ones to take income over benefits and generous leave while they expect to not have to choose and thus don’t.  And men who want to marry won’t if they aren’t pretty confident they can decisively earn 60% or more of the household income.

Data reference is from here, covering people who were born in the 1990s as the youngest end of the spectrum.

Almost all American married parents are Amazon Prime customers.

Amazon recently revealed they have 90 million or so Prime users in America, and that in the income ranges that mark the married class they have 70 to 90% uptake, with the 100k+ being close to 90% as far as they can tell.  By nearly any guess or estimate or account list, the majority of American households period are not just buying from Amazon, but subscribed to its Prime division.

I see right wing people brag about not buying from Amazon ever, and then I look at the reality on the ground for married mothers, who continue to have most of the children.

Acknowledgement of the extent of SCALE is part of the way towards reducing it.  Bragging on a Amazon Web Services-backed server about how you personally never go near the website to buy books or whatever, not so much.

Fast facts about married with kids income compared to all households.

Less than 10% of all households making under 50k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 20% of all households making 50-99k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 33% of all households making 100-149k/yr are married with under-18 kids.

About 40% of all households making 150k/yr or more are married with under-18 kids.

Interesting pattern, that.

Source: 2016 ACS data on household income in the past 12 months.