Births by education level, 2016

 

(click to expand)

What is interesting about this is that education aids in married fertility, but a little goes a long way.  Completing a level of education corresponds to lower out of wedlock birth rate regardless of how high the level of education is.

Thus in a lot of ways, simply having people complete the highest level they reasonably can of education would be a better way to structure the educational system and allow for more options to enter the workforce successfully at younger ages.  This would probably have a side effect of increasing marriage before 25 in a way that favored long-term marital stability.

 

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A PhD in three years? Maybe.

I’m an uneducated housewife.  However, I’m working on PhD-level work (at least, nobody without one appears to be doing what I’m doing, ‘cept me), so there is a small chance I will end up with one anyway.

It’s pretty clear I’ve been struggling quite a bit because I didn’t want to admit the situation was what it was.  It’s hard to accept I might have to work with people whose entire lives are devoted to views and practices regarding education that have directly made my life incredibly difficult and made educating my own children a home-based project, but I’m probably not going to be able to stay on schedule without accepting that it may be what I have to do to complete the mission.

So this is acceptance.  Also, about the only detailed public comment I’m making about Project Y’ this year and maybe next.

Are half of all college-educated American women infertile?

A third of U.S. adults say they have used fertility treatments or know someone who has

The numbers are, of course, higher still for the college-educated and 75k+.

“About four-in-ten (43%) of those with a bachelor’s degree have had some exposure to fertility treatment – either through their own experience or that of someone they know – and the share rises to 56% among those with a postgraduate degree. About half (48%) of people with family incomes of $75,000 or more also have been exposed to fertility treatment.”

This is kind of scary because it suggests that almost all fertility boost that isn’t from immigrants moving and having an initial baby boom is from artificial hormone cocktails.  Or, alternatively, that vast numbers of women are subfertile or infertile.  The link only covers IVF specifically, but it does note that the actual survey didn’t specify, and there’s a long list of non-IVF hormone cocktails out there.

Sending fiction to the back burner (writing update)

As I’ve posted, I hoped to get a little bit of fiction published this year and start working under a pen name more regularly.  But alternatives exclude and to get some nonfiction done that I think is ultimately more important to do over the next five years, I’m just setting the idea of submitting stories aside.

I’d like to make (more) money writing fiction and see how high the tally can go, but I don’t have 72 hours a day and something nonessential has to be put aside, very hopefully temporarily.

So, on to nonfiction, which is harder, takes longer and which I can’t really post online sooner than next year unless things go super awesome for me this year.  Here’s hoping.