Conservatives and the IT Ghost Dance

“One of the IT drones who got replaced by H1B Indians testified to Congress the other day, and just endorsed Trump.

It’s a despicable move by Disney, but fortunately they’ll reap the “rewards” of their decision as soon as all the whites they laid off are gone. There’s nothing more dysfunctional than a large group of Indians whose thought process can’t deviate from the flowchart. And there’s nothing more infuriating for the productive types (whites) than a flowchart-reading Indian.

What’ll wind up happening is Disney will either hire their old employees back as consultants, or they’ll have vendors do the real work. Vendors which, not coincidentally, happen to be white and staffed with people who are like the people they laid off. At 3x the rate.”

Another special from the My Posting Career crew.  Stripped of the racial overtones, this excerpt is bog-standard average conservative or right-wing.  It’s the IT Ghost Dance, the belief that (white) guys are all easily able to adapt to endless shifting job sands by getting extremely high paying IT consulting gigs cleaning up the outsourcing mess.

It undergirds the conservative promotion of homeschooling, of SAHMing, of living a rural prepper/homesteader life (just telecommute for six figures!), of having more kids than fingers on a hand, of whatever conservative shibboleth you please.  It’s always there and always lucrative at top 10% or even 1% levels, you just have to want it enough.

It’s really really common.  Perhaps because conservatives can’t have much of a social life in IT offline due to the high amount of libertarians and such, they are all over homesteading and farming online and have been even before we took a stab at our own agrarian LARPing (currently pending due to the same kind of health breakdowns that sent people back to the East from OG homesteading).

It also exposes the core lie of “just reskill, reskill, reskill” that is bipartisan.  There’s IT and healthcare (tons of nurses homesteading because of flex schedules) and not a whole lot else that’s telecommute or flex-schedule friendly and pays anywhere near enough to fund the kind of “self-sufficient” and independent lifestyles mentioned above.

Again, ripped only from my own experiences, but non-IT conservatives who’ve tried these things invariably end up putting the kids in public school or having to be double-income explicitly.

 

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14 thoughts on “Conservatives and the IT Ghost Dance

  1. What’ll wind up happening is Disney will either hire their old employees back as consultants, or they’ll have vendors do the real work. Vendors which, not coincidentally, happen to be white and staffed with people who are like the people they laid off. At 3x the rate.”

    My husband has on numerous occasions found himself a contractor at companies (large and small) which had previously disbanded, outsourced or replaced the lion’s share of their IT departments to foreigners. What you said here is a big part of that. But we’re still not rich, LOL.

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  2. I come from a family of immigrants, so naturally they’re not well disposed to the plight of the natives. A week ago, they were gushing about how brilliant Indians are in medicine/technology, but when I mentioned that the primary reason they’re in the States is because they can do the same work for a fraction of the pay, an uncomfortable silence took over the dinner table. You could hear a pin drop.

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    • Bingo.

      What people don’t understand about the economy is companies don’t want to hire us. They’d rather find a way to pay significantly less, and expect twice as much work. I’ve been laid off from outsourcing myself, so this is kind of a sore issue for me.

      Unfortunately, the idea of “adaptability” is a well-sound argument in the current market, and if you can’t work it expect to be out of a job. It’s one of the few ways to remain valuable and compete with foreigners.

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  3. IT dudes who can’t be overseas-outsourced are the plumbers and electricians of the modern age. They fix stuff. If your work can be done with a phone call, you can be outsourced. If your work has to be done hands-on, you can’t be. Thus, learn to fix the hardware, run the lines, jimmy the printer, etc.

    Thing is, most IT dudes start their ways up the hierarchy on help-desk, which is phone work. And phone work has been outsourced. So the pool of apprentice IT dudes is gone. The journeymen and masters did indeed just move on to consulting, or took jobs with companies who need someone to take care of the entire network.

    When we think of IT work as white-collar work, we’re lying to ourselves. Yeah, it’s in an office – but it’s blue-collar in nature. (This is why it’s more important to have certifications than a degree – really they want to know you can fix the things, not that you understand the theory).

    Personally I’m wondering how long our international economy of endless outsourcing of everything can last before it collapses. It keeps hanging on…

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    • >Personally I’m wondering how long our international economy of endless outsourcing of everything can last before it collapses.

      It will last until the standard of living in San Francisco mirrors that of Calcutta*.

      *Substantial homeless population notwithstanding.

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    • When companies demand degrees vs. certs or the other way around, candidates have to meet the needs of the market. It doesn’t always make sense but that’s what they want. The jobs have to exist where you live, as well.

      What kind of IT jobs are we talking here? Hardware, helpdesk, infrastructure, software development, etc.? Because the market’s slightly different based on each niche.

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  4. My husband does both hardware and software, and maintains networks. He doesn’t have a degree but he has 20+ years experience. Oh, not to mention management experience. He may need to consider a degree at some point but the head hunters think given what he brings to the table combined with his relative youth (42) he doesn’t have to run and get one at this point.

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    • If he’s got 20+ years and management, he’d have no problem. For younger people and newbies, a degree is required. I’ve interviewed with companies that flat out said they prefer degree educated people over self-taught, for various reasons.

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      • My husband has no degree and obsolete certifications and while it’s working out for us all pretty well, it was very high risk for him to never go get a degree or anything while working. Which is kind of the point of my post. For a few these endless shifting sands wash up decent riches, but mostly over time it’s higher and higher risk to get anything middle class level. And yet there’s this whole Lake Wobegon assumption undergirding what people tell each other and their kids.

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        • You’re right about the stupid things people tell their kids. Such as how eeevilll it is to get a college degree. Especially if they are female. One of those lies conservatives believe. And no, I am not saying that every person must go to college.

          But we harbor no such delusions that a young man or woman today should (or even could!) do what we did.

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          • Elspeth said:

            “You’re right about the stupid things people tell their kids. Such as how eeevilll it is to get a college degree. Especially if they are female.”

            Yeah. My favorite is when people like that bat away any data about higher marriage rates and lower divorce rates for college-educated women by saying that it’s just a proxy for intelligence and diligence. That may be at least partially true, but how in blazes is a woman supposed to signal to a prospective suitor that she has those features if she doesn’t do college or have a serious job?

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            • I’m not sure I can entirely trust a lot of the data on divorce and education anymore. It always appears to be changing, and something tells me there must be some moderating variable or lesser factor influencing the effect or marital longevity.

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              • Maea said:

                “I’m not sure I can entirely trust a lot of the data on divorce and education anymore.”

                One problem is that across generations, the number of people who do college is very different. So the demographics of the pools are continually changing–even with high school, we can’t really compare the high school graduate of 1963 with the high school graduate of 2013.

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