The American right rejects systemic critique and this is bad

Sometimes the problem is with the system and it’s not just a bunch of individuals failing to do things properly.

I had an example from instapundit with him mocking some woman who wrote about the shifts in mothering expectations compared to in her mother’s time (the 1970s in this case), but I can’t find the link anymore, so too bad for me.  But I was going to use it to point out that huge shifts in mechanization, industrialization, globalization of capital and stripping local regions of economic, social and political autonomy are the means by which we get women acting in strange ways when it comes to things like child-rearing or marriage and that mocking them on an individual basis means that the critiques miss the systemic aspects that require collective effort to reverse or alter.

Pointing and laughing at individual women or men is how conservatives get out of really interrogating the impacts of overscaled systems and deracination on community and individual behavior and life.

The level of social isolation the average American tolerates would have been unheard of even during the 1970s and 1980s.  Instead of systemic critique about this, though, it’s all fantasy LARPing on the internet about submissive housewives and “bull alpha” men and “edgelords of reaction” (manosphere and alt-right conservatives) who will restore Western civilization single-handedly (don’t ask what the other hand is doing, thanks).  And in the mainstream conservative and right-wing world, it’s a gloriously stubborn belief that Business As Usual will continue if only they can vote out those dastardly “libs”.

But it’s hard to get out of the social isolation.  We’ve gone from the days when hermits and anchorites would come to church every single Sunday to people thinking it is acceptable and normal to not see anyone other than your children for days or weeks at a time (SAHM isolation) or no-one at all while you work from home or play from home online (single male and female isolation).  And it’s very hard when you yourself are worn out to keep forcing social interactions because absolutely nothing organic exists.  No neighbors stop by, there’s nothing you might need to borrow, there’s no traveling service sellers, and families don’t all live in the same houses or on the same street or share a couple of adjoining homestead parcels anymore.  When you have to initiate every single possible social interaction outside your home, that exhausts all but the most aggressively social people, and can tucker plenty of them out too.

But even though I am talking about way more people than tired housewives here, conservatives don’t care about the systemic changes that lead to tens of millions living in isolation from other humans except through the hugely inferior interactions of internet and phone.  Or maybe they’re afraid to confront the vastness of the problem.  It could well be ego destroying to consider how terrible and huge the problem is and how many people suffer for it, male and female alike.

Like I opened with, this is bad.

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6 thoughts on “The American right rejects systemic critique and this is bad”

  1. No neighbors stop by, there’s nothing you might need to borrow, there’s no traveling service sellers, and families don’t all live in the same houses or on the same street or share a couple of adjoining homestead parcels anymore. When you have to initiate every single possible social interaction outside your home, that exhausts all but the most aggressively social people, and can tucker plenty of them out too.

    Amen to this. I was just thinking today how blessed I am to have my (now) young adult daughters around. I can actually talk about current events and politics with real adults in person.

    It’s a little better during the months from September to April because of co-op, but even then it’s not the same as it was when I was girl growing up in the 70’s when our parents actually had spontaneous conversations and visits on foot with people who lived near us and went to church with us twice a week. Organic, I believe is the word you used.

    This is an excellent post, Lady. I hope it generates discussion because it should.

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  2. Love this post, Lady.

    One other observation – the isolation creeps up on us; we start out excited with the newness of telecommuting or being home with new baby/children; it takes a while to notice that we haven’t actually spoken to anyone )outside a spouse or other family member) for weeks on end. Well, maybe there’s a teeny bit of socialization going to church or the grocery store, but not much. We just don’t notice it happening until we’re overwhelmed by the silence, so to speak.

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  3. I just discovered this blog today and I’ve already read this post 5 times. I am literally reading my own thoughts here; thank you so much Practical Conservative. To be honest, I am surprised that you are a woman to boot, I don’t usually expect to be on the same wavelength as women, this is quite a sweet surprise. The other posts seem quite interesting as well, I think I’ll delve in. Kudos to you.

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  4. This is what drove my mother to distraction when we were growing up – she had not adult interaction except for a women’s Bible Study (with childcare!) at the local Nazarene church, run by the pastor’s wife, that disappeared completely when they changed pastors.

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  5. Abusers don’t accept systemic analysis of their behavior either, they want each incident dealt with individually because it’s in the pattern of abuse that their colors really show. Things that make you go hmm….

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