Homeschool curriculum ideas

Just a few quick ideas.

  1. Accurate black history and accomplishments (yes, black people have Done Stuff, there is a world of notable achievements that may not be spaceships in Egypt but is also not all made up feelgood myths.)
  2. Accurate history in general.  True neutrality for basic histories of America (since I’m American).
  3. Accurate women’s history (cf. my post about the domestic sphere).  I’m not linking back to my post about continuity preservation in the domestic sphere because I don’t want to get further in the weeds of using one version of an idea to stand in for further refinements.  And there will be further refinements about why accurate women’s history is crucial to restoring normal life.  It’s more than just the domestic sphere, it’s providing children with an understanding of the tradeoffs that come when women have more or less hard power in a society.  And the tradeoffs that come from the various ways women wield their soft power.
  4. Honesty about how a lot of ‘traditional nationalism’ is warmed-over pap from the 19th century and no earlier.
  5. Making a curriculum out of the extensive home economics and household efficiency literature that is easily available and totally ignored, but adapted to modern living.  No, appliances aren’t your handmaidens.  But there are body and health-saving ways to do a lot of basic tasks.
  6. Real mechanical/technical information.  How to use an ax, for example.  That information is incredibly useful, but extremely difficult to find online, yet would easily lend itself to a well ordered curriculum.
  7. Proper science.  This lady is a great start (and covers more than just science!), but it’s not like there could be too many quality science homeschool curriculums.  Caveat for us Protestants– she is quite devoted to her Catholicism and her curriculums obviously reflect this.  Still, there is plenty of wheat available without getting into a doctrinal fistfight.
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One thought on “Homeschool curriculum ideas”

  1. It’s more than just the domestic sphere, it’s providing children with an understanding of the tradeoffs that come when women have more or less hard power in a society. And the tradeoffs that come from the various ways women wield their soft power.

    I’m intrigued with this line of thought and will be looking forward to those further refinements.

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